Archive for the ‘Arduino’ Category

Hardware, Software and Badger!

Saturday, August 6th, 2011

Its been a while since I wrote a blog post. The delay has been due to my immersion in the world of Badger. What is Badger? Its my awesome project and I will talk about it after I share my IOIO findings.

I noticed that sparkfun stopped selling the ioio module for some reason. After researching possible causes, I realized they had just updated the module.

While looking into the possible causes for the [non-exitent] demise of the ioio, I found a bunch amazing projects! The cool thing about the ioio is the ability to control hardware with software, in this case with your android phone! First you have the good old “hello world” which is usually a little blinking LED like this:

While looking for hello “hello world” videos of ioio’s I found this new little micro-controller by GHI Electronics called the FEZ Domino, a .NET Micro Framework module to interface with the Android. It looks like a nifty little MC and its open source, as far as i can tell.

Weather its the FEZ or the ioio, after your Eureka moment, there will be a flood of possibilities crossing your mind. Soon you will be making little interesting projects with your Android’s accelerometer and the voice recognition apps:

And sooner than later, you make the leap to making a robotic contraption with an algorithm that can actually solve the most difficult of puzzles like the V-cube 7:

This brings me back to why I’m writing this blog post.
1. I love opensource hardware
2. I love mobile
3. I began a project called Badger that has sucked my time and would like to tell you about it!

Badger is a website (and soon an iPhone App) that allows you to make badges of anything that interests you. These badges become Visual Hash Tags that are used to group picture and videos that people upload into blogs and maps.

This is a map of the stuff that I uploaded to Badger from my Desktop, Android (via picture text message) and iPhone App (The Beta).

badger map

Badger gives you a place to upload pictures of interesting things that you encounter. Even if they may seem like silly mundane thing that nobody cares about.

In Badger people like Jacek (Co-Founder) made a “Street Art” badge to upload all the street art that he sees. Since badges are collective, anyone can submit content to the badge. Natan (Co-Founder) and I started uploading pictures to the street art badge which is becoming an interesting game/conversation around this topic. I cannot see street art now with out having the need to “Badge” it and I did not even know I liked street art this much!

badger blog

In Badger everyone cares! All the pictures are public, which means that everyone interested in similar topics is looking. You can share the silly pictures you take (which Badger takes very serious), like that nice lamp you saw at the restaurant that was serving the fancy drinks! Or maybe it was a bug that you stumbled across while taking a break from riding you bike around town.

Badger is about all those moments when you are behind the camera, not in front of it. We are hoping that Badger becomes the central venue to go find a map or a blog of pictures about anything! And a place to perhaps connect with a group of people that are interested in the things that you might find weirdly appealing… or not.

Fell free to sign up to the Beta Site and poke around at the content. Every picture has a badge associated to it and you can see more pictures that are similar by clicking on the badge associated to the picture. You can make your own badges once you sign up. Try it out and send us some feedback if you like, at info [at] playbadger.com

News On The P-Comp and Mobile Front

Friday, May 20th, 2011

I’ve notice that we are making some interesting leaps in technology. Geeks and Nerds are innovating at a faster rate than I initially thought. Open source projects are making great leaps specially in the mobile world.

Here are some projects that have great potential. They are just beginning to scratch the surface and is a sign of the greater things to come.

The first trend that’s happening is the use of androids to interface with PCs. Here is a little hacked software that allows the android phone to act as a mouse controller for a computer.

RemoteDroid demo from Joshua Sera on Vimeo.

Sooner than later you will have software on your phone to control just about anything with an internet connection and digital controls.

An other little device that will certainly enable hackers and techies to do some rapid prototyping is the IOIO (pronounced yoyo.)

The IOIO is an open-source micro controller that connects to your android phone. The little micro controller is packed with 16 analog inputs, 9 PWM outputs and an astonishing 48 i/o digital pins. This will allow you to make gadgets control via mobile device:

If you think that these innovations are already too cool for their own good. You have not kept up with ubuntu news. Just a few weeks ago the news spread like wildfire about the Raspberry Pi:

I mean just look at what’s packed into this little computer that is no bigger than a pack of chewing gum or a USB stick!

- 700MHz ARM11
- 256MB of SDRAM
- OpenGL ES 2.0
- 1080p30 H.264 high-profile decode
- Composite and HDMI video output
- USB 2.0
- SD/MMC/SDIO memory card slot
- General-purpose I/O
- Open software (Ubuntu, Iceweasel, KOffice, Python)

With all this, what else do you need to make your very own terminator…

Here is a good resource video with lots of helpful links in the video description:

I guess you would need the generative titanium and the living tissue colonies etc. but that’s besides the point. The tools are there to make just about anything and it fit in the palm of your hand. Plus when you add the additional open source software, you have an arsenal of tools that is unmatched aka hackarsenal…

Sooner than later, you will be able to build your own mini helper:

Or just buy one for your self and then customize it:

I predict that by next year this time, we will have fully functional personal computers the size of your cellphone that you can carry around everywhere like a laptop, but pocket sized.

Jackoon at NYC Resistor Show

Thursday, March 25th, 2010


NYC Resistor is hosting “Art, Design, and the Arduino: a lineage” Curated by Alicia Gibb

March 27th, 2010 8-12pm

At NYC Resistor
87 3rd Avenue,
4th Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11217

$10 Admission

In addition to artworks using the Arduino, the first prototype of the original Arduino from the collection of Massimo Banzi will be shown.

Works include a lineage of variations, modifications and relations to the Arduino microcontroller:
Hc Gilje
Aaron Koblin
Laura Greig
Hernando Barragán
Edith Kollath
Jan Borchers & René Bohne
Becky Stern
Oscar G. Torres & Jackoon
Raphael Abrams
Joe Saavedra

Curated by Alicia Gibb

RSVPs are appreciated:
http://www.nycresistor.com/2010/03/21/art-design-and-the-arduino-a-lineage/

More about the Artists:
http://www.nycresistor.com/2010/03/21/superstars-of-the-arduino/

Google Map of show location.

View Larger Map

Venue image:

Jackoon at the Gizmodo Gallery 2009:

Jackoon pair Painting at Gizmodo Gallery 2009 from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo.

More Art Robotica

Wednesday, May 20th, 2009

These are some of the Paintings that I made with Jackoon at the ITP Spring 2009 show:

Reference image, wasp on a flower:

wasp

Collaborative Painting:

Reference image, rodent a skull of a species in the order Carnivora:


Jackoon Painting:

As you can see on the painting of the Skull, Jackoon managed o paint the general area where the skull should be. The brush strokes where not as precise as should be, because the lighting conditions where not optimal at the ITP show so the tracking system was a little off.

Someone at the ITP show told me something really inspiring; “This is the worst work that [Jackoon] and the other artbots will paint. They will only get better.” I agree, even now the paintings are amazing.

Link to pieces that where hanging at the show while Jackoon was making the art above. http://blubee.com/theblog/?p=309

Art Robotica in the ITP Spring Show 2009

Saturday, May 9th, 2009

This is some of the art that I showed at the ITP Spring Show 2009 exhibit.

The Art:

“Lemon Wasp” 2009
Acrylic on paper, 48”x 48”


“Daisy” 2009
Acrylic on paper, 48”x 40”

The Art Bots:

Jackoon at work:

Jackoon Painting from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo.

Art Robotica: Thesis Presentation!

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

Art Robotica is a term used to describe the body of work created by the collaboration of “ArtBot” and artist. ArtBots are Autonomous Machines that paint or draw on a canvas, sheet of paper or a surface of some kind. Art Robotica reflects our new codependency and symbiotic relationship with machines. ArtBots are, in essence, collaborators rather than just new tools.

A presentation of Art Robotica was part of ITP Thesis Week 2009.
The thesis presentation was Tuesday May 5, 2009 at NYU’s ITP (721 Broadway, 4th floor)

Web Video Archive:

http://itp.nyu.edu/shows/thesis2009/video-stream/

This is one of the paintings created so far:


“Girl” 2009, Acrylic on paper, 48″ x40″

To find out more about Art Robotica visit:
http://blubee.com/artRobotica/

More Art Robotica:
http://blubee.com/theblog/?p=318

Artbots The Testing Begins

Monday, April 6th, 2009


The ArtBots begins to take shape. I started the project by tackling the bot that will be the most complex, the hexapod.


I made a the basic form of the bot using some wood screws and tape to begin testing the movement, software and circuit.


Servo Motor Test from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo.

I was originally going to attempt to use an Arduino Micro controller to do all the controlling of the servos (video above.) But I slowly realized that to control the timing of all the servos at different time intervals will be a big pain in the butt since the “delay()” function messes with the Arduino code enough to get really buggy.

To hopefully save a headache I bought some servo controllers made by Pololu And so far with the help from Xiaoyang (Alex) Feng and the info posted online about the controller, I got the results I was looking for.

The Pololu Code I used to make the servos move can be found on the Pololu forums The one things that they did not include which is a little confusing, is how to set up the servo controllers if you plan to daisy chain them to control more than 8 servo motors.


To start you should set up your Arduino (above) and a breadboard with the Pololu servo controller (below.)


A couple of things to note:
1. Two different power sources are needed for the servo controllers. One for the controller’s micro controller and the other to power the servo motors. Both power sources should have a common ground.
2. When you set the controller’s number setting, you need to do one at a time.

This is the code I used to program my second controller to know its servos are numbered 8-15 and not 0-7 as they are programmed by default.

http://blubee.com/itp/code/ServoControl_numSettingA.txt

The parameter that sets the servo numbers is the fourth “soft.Serial” line of code “softSerial.print(0×01,BYTE);” This variable can be either 0×00 (hexadecimal) to set the controller to use number 0-7 for the servos, 0×01 to set the controller to use number 8-15 for the servos, 0×02 for numbers 16-23, etc…

Once you upload this code you must wait for the servo controller to get reprogrammed. You will know the servo controller’s settings where changed by the blinky lights on the controller.


Pololu Servo Controller Settings from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo.

Once the code has been uploaded and the settings where changes, you MUST delete or comment out, the three lines that set up the servo numbers since you only need to do that step once.

the lines you need to delete or comment out are the following:
softSerial.print(0×80,BYTE);
softSerial.print(0×02,BYTE);
softSerial.print(0×01,BYTE);

Once you comment out the code above, re-load the code onto the Arduino.
When the code is finished uploading nothing will happen, because you need to re-start the Pololu servo controller for the settings to kick in. You can simply unplug the Arduino and the plug it back in to refresh everything. The servos should now move a few degrees back and fourth. Don’t forget to power the servos separately and to have a common ground.


Servo Controller Test from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo.

I daisy chained three servo controllers together so that I can control 20 servo motors. This is my first test, one serve per servo controller. So far so good.


Testing Servo Controller with Three Servos from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo.

WAMI Dome at Electronic Social Club Exhibit.

Monday, November 17th, 2008

WAMI

The WAMI Dome got some exposure at the Electronic Social Club’s Annual Exhibit at Hunter College. Everyone really enjoyed to play with the little dome and its square wave sounds.

This is a video of the dome in action:

The Jimmy (WAMI Dome) at ESC Exhibit. from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo.

WAMI Dome update

Thursday, July 31st, 2008

WAMI Dome

The new generation of WAMIs is in the works and functioning, its time to put the final touches on. I am very pleased with the sounds coming out of this bad boy. This WAMI definitely going to make some crazy beats.
And also I will put out the info aka DIY so you can make your own! =)



Wami Dome from Oscar G. Torres on Vimeo

Helios: The Power Tree

Tuesday, May 13th, 2008

Helios Tree

I will be showing the Helios Power Tree in the ITP Spring Show 2008.
Here are some links to more blog entrees about this project:

Concept:
http://blubee.com/theblog/?p=51

About the installation:
http://blubee.com/theblog/?p=94

technical info:
http://blubee.com/theblog/?p=84

Feel free to leave me a comment about what you think of the tree.